Past Exhibits

2017 LSU Discover Day Juried Student Art Show
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LSU Discover Day Juried Student Art Show

LSU Discover is pleased to host the first annual LSU Discover Juried Student Art Show, from April 1 – April 27, 2017 in the LSU Student Union Art Gallery. This art exhibit is part of the annual LSU Discover Day undergraduate research and creativity symposium, and showcases undergraduate student artwork in a variety of media. The exhibit was juried by LSU faculty and local artists, and awards will be presented to the top submissions.

We encourage you to stop by and view for yourself the creativity of LSU art students in action!

Interested in meeting the artists? Stop by between 9 a.m. – 11 a.m. on April 4th!

The exhibit is free & everyone is welcome!

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documentingBlues Photography Exhibit
By Featured Artist Jenn Ocken

Local photographer Jenn Ocken displays her powerful photographs of the Blues genre and this inspiring music community with the LSU Student Union Art Gallery from March 13- April, 2017. This show is in conjunction with the Langston Hughes Project.

The exhibit is free & open to everyone.

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2017 LSU Student Art Show

2017 LSU Student Art Show

The LSU Union Art Gallery invites LSU and the Greater Baton Rouge communities to browse works of art submitted by undergraduates and graduates of the university’s student body! The LSU Student Art Show runs Monday, February 13 – Friday, March 10, 2017 at the LSU Student Union Art Gallery located on the second floor of the LSU Student Union. The exhibit is free & open to everyone.

A call to artists was put out to all students attending the university regardless of major. Political Science majors, Psychologists, Landscape Architects and Education majors alike answered that call. Beautiful pieces of art spanning mediums that include drawing, digital art, audio pieces, photography, painting, sculpture and more are currently on display at the 2017 LSU Student Art Show!

Support local student art and enjoy pieces from up and coming LSU artists at the 2017 LSU Student Art Show at the LSU Student Union Art Gallery!

Exhibit is free & open to the public

The New American Garden The Landscape Architecture of Oehme & van Sweden

The New American Garden
The Landscape Architecture of Oehme & van Sweden

October 19—December 9, 2016
LSU Student Union Art Gallery

The LSU Student Union Art Gallery is proud to present  The New American Garden: The Landscape Architecture of Oehme, van Sweden, a photographic landscape architecture exhibition which chronicles the careers and influence of Wolfgang Oehme and James van Sweden . The exhibit boasts a variety of contemporary and newly commissioned photographs of important residential, civic, and commercial projects. It will be on display October 19-December 9, 2016 &is free & open to the public Oehme & van Sweden revolutionized the field of landscape architecture Screen Shot 2016-04-28 at 11.26.31 AMwith their New American Garden typology, one centered on the use of broad and lush sweeps of grasses and perennials, and rich contrasts of textures, rather than the neatly clipped lawn-based landscapes that characterized postwar American design.

Significant public examples in Washington, D.C. include their breakthrough project, the Federal Reserve Board Garden, along with the National WWII Memorial, U.S. National Arboretum, the German-American Friendship Garden, Reagan National Airport, the Department of State International Chancery Center, the planting design for Pershing Park (the park is designed by M.Paul Friedberg), a complex of Capitol Hill Town Homes and others.

The traveling photographic exhibition is organized by and presented in collaboration with The Cultural Landscape Foundation (TCLF).

David Humphreys & Aaron Hogan Exhibit

David Humphreys & Aaron Hogan Exhibit
June 6- October 7, 2016
LSU Student Union Art Gallery

In many ways, local artists are at the heart of every community. Local art can bring a community together by giving the people who live in that community personal enjoyment and intellectual stimulation while encouraging local involvement.The LSU Student Union Art Gallery is very fortunate and proud to be a part of the local Baton Rouge arts and is pleased to present two local artists who have co-created our summer art gallery exhibit! The David Humphreys & Aaron Hogan Photography Exhibit. The exhibit will be on display June 6- October 7, 2016. The exhibit is free & everyone is welcome!

ARTISTS STATEMENT:Screen Shot 2016-04-28 at 10.26.43 AMDAVID HUMPHREYS: 36 years as a professional image creator. I don’t just take photos, I make photos! I am a first adopter and always moving forward. I have been on the cutting edge of my profession for my entire career. I offer Advertising and Commercial Photography, as well as Corporate Portraiture, Fine Art, Fine Art Reproduction, Fine Art Printing, and Photo Restoration. Attention to detail and developing the patience required to make the image come to life is the hidden secret. My years of visualization, and the fact that I developed my abilities during the analog world of photography,  help to bring a special edge to the constantly moving world of digital photography. I bring  more to the table, and make it a pleasure for everyone to enjoy the meal!!!

AARON HOGAN: Aaron Hogan has been Screen Shot 2016-04-28 at 10.26.19 AMlistening, looking, and loving his entire life, and took to photography professionally in 2006 to express that gift to a growing list of clients, whose sessions have taken him across the US and internationally in pursuit of the perfect image. He loves nothing more than to spend time with the people he will photograph, laugh with them, listen to their goals, and design a photographic story that captures them perfectly at that moment in time.

 

Matt Shlian Exhibit

Matt Shlian Exhibit

 April 18—May 24, 2016
LSU Student Union Art Gallery

Matthew-Shlian-when-you2Matt Shlian, a paper engineer rooted in book arts, print media and design, brings his traveling to the LSU Student Union Art Gallery from April 18- May 24, 2016. The exhibit is free & open to everyoneThrough the exhibit, Shlian explores how fine art, design, math and science relate to each other. Shlian allows his work to evolve on its own by beginning with an initial fold—a single action that then causes a transfer of energy to subsequent folds—that ultimately manifest in his matthew_shlian1drawings and three-dimensional forms.

Shlian also uses his engineering skills to create kinetic sculpture, collaborating with scientists at the University of Michigan. While researchers see paper engineering as a metaphor for scientific principles, he sees their inquiry as a basis for artistic inspiration, according to Shlian.

BIO:

Matthew Shlian is an artist/designer and founder of the Initiative Artist Studio in Ann Arbor, Michigan.  His work extends from drawings to large scale installations to collaborations with leading scientists at the University of Michigan. His work for the National Science Foundation explores paper folding structures on the macro level translated to the nano-scale. His client list includes Ghostly International, Apple, P&G, Facebook, Leviís, Sesame Street and the Queen of Jordan.  His work can be seen at www.mattshlian.com and eightemperors.com

ARTISTS STATEMENT:

As a paper engineer my work is rooted in print media, book arts and commercial design.  Beginning with an initial fold, a single action causes a transfer of energy to subsequent folds, which ultimately manifest in drawings and three dimensional forms.  I use my engineering skills to create kinetic sculpture which have lead to collaborations with scientists at the University of Michigan. Researchers see paper engineering as a metaphor for scientific principals; I see their inquiry as basis for artistic inspiration.  In my studio I am a collaborator, explorer and inventor.  I begin with a system of folding and at a particular moment the material takes over. Guided by wonder, my work is made because I cannot visualize its final realization; in this way I come to understanding through curiosity.

2016 LSU Student Art Show

2016 LSU Student Art Show 

LSU Auxiliary Services & The LSU Union Art Gallery invites LSU and the Greater Baton Rouge communities to browse works of art submitted by undergraduates and graduates of the university’s student body! The LSU Student Art Show runs Wednesday, March 30 – April 8, 2016 at the 11060315_919444444743111_1667990697314298670_nLSU Student Union Art Gallery located on the second floor of the LSU Student Union. The exhibit is free & open to everyone.

A call to artists was put out to all attending the university including students from all majors. Graphic Design, Digital Art, Engineering, Biology, Psychology, Mass Communication and Animal Dairy Poultry Science answered that call. Beautiful pieces of art
spanning mediums that include drawing, printmaking, photography, painting and more are currently on display at the 2016 LSU Student Art Show!

Support local Student art and come enjoy art from up and coming LSU student artists at the 2016 LSU Student Art Show at the LSU Student Union Art Gallery!

 Exhibit is free & open to the public
LaRK Ceramics Exhibit

LaRK Ceramics Exhibit
 January 25—February 19, 2016
LSU Student Union Art Gallery

The LSU School of Art Ceramics Program has teamed up with the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville Ceramics Program to bring the LSU & Baton Rouge Community the LaRK Ceramics Exhibit. The Exhibit will be on display from January 25- February 19, 2016. It is free & everyone is welcome!Explore a variety of ceramic works created by graduates and post-bac students from both universities! From pottery to sculptures to mixed media, there is something for everyone to enjoy and learn about!

LSU Graduate Ceramic School Artists

  • Adam Meistrell, Second year LSU MFA Ceramics graduate student.
  • Naomi Clement, Second year graduate student
  • Grace Tessein, First year graduate student
  • Bri Ozanne, Second year graduate student
  • Melodie Reay, Third year graduate student
  • Jenni Lombardi, Third year graduate student
  • Mike Stumbras,  Second year graduate student
  • Jodie Masterman, First year graduate student
  • Ransome Little Post-baccalaureate student
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Graduate Ceramic School Artists
  • Katrina Rattermann, Second Year Graduate Student
  • Lindsey Heiden, First Year Graduate Student
  • Rich Peterson, First Year Graduate Student
  • Aimee Odum, Third Year Graduate Student
  • Chris Drobnock, Third Year Graduate Student
  • Lucero Aguirre, Post-Baccalaureate Student in Ceramics

The Landscape Architecture Legacy of Dan Kiley

The Landscape Architecture Legacy of Dan Kiley

October 9—December 12, 2015

LSU Student Union Art Gallery

EXHIBIT:

The Landscape Architecture Legacy of Dan Kiley, a traveling photographic exhibition organized by  The Cultural Landscape Foundation that honors one of the most important Modernist landscape architects, opens at the at the LSU Student Union Art Gallery Wednesday, October 9- Saturday, December 12, 2015 and is hosted by the Landscape Architecture Department at the LSU. This traveling photography exhibit celebrates the life and career of Dan Kiley, one of the most important and influential Modernist landscape architects of the 20th century and calls attention to the need for informed and effective stewardship of his work – and by extension Modernist landscape design.

ABOUT DAN KILEY:dan kiley exhibition
Dan Kiley (1912-2004) was an American landscape architect who designed more than 1,000 projects worldwide throughout his career, including the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial in St. Louis and the Art Institute of Chicago’s South Garden.During his extensive career, he worked with equally significant architects, including Eero Saarinen, Louis Kahn, and I. M. Pei, to create internationally acknowledged design icons.
For more information about the exhibition and Dan Kiley, visit tclf.org.
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Holding Out and Hanging On: Surviving Hurricane Katrina Photographs and Narratives by Thomas Neff

Holding Out and Hanging On: Surviving Hurricane Katrina
Photographs and Narratives by Thomas Neff

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The LSU Student Union Art Gallery will hosted Holding Out and Hanging On: Surviving Hurricane Katrina- Photography and Narratives by Thomas Neff from September 2- September 30, 2015.

ARTIST STATEMENT:

Two decades before the events of Katrina unfolded; a major theme of my work was documenting the rapidly disappearing single-family farms and ranches in Colorado. After moving to Louisiana in 1982, whenever I could, I’d stop by anScreen Shot 2015-09-02 at 8.09.02 AMd visit with these ranchers, composing new photographs. During this time, the conversations often revolved around how difficult it was scratching a living from the land in the face of pressures from agribusiness conglomerates that were taking over their family owned farms. As I listened, it became evident that these gripping stories needed to be recorded, so in time, written narratives began to accompany many of the images. In part, I was influenced by the seminal work of James Agee and Walker Evans, who in the mid-1930s documented the lives of three tenant farm families in Hale County, Alabama. Their book,Let Us Now Praise Famous Men is considered the first endeavor on the part of writer and photographer to offer equal contributions to “complete” a story. I hoped that my efforts would serve in the same regard.

In 2005, in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, I once again heard the calling to become both a photographer and writer. For me, the epiphany to photograph “holdouts” came on the first day of a search and rescue operation while assisting with the evacuation of New Orleanians who either chose to stay or could not evacuate prior to the onset of Katrina. This endeavor proved to be a catalyst which developed into both a project and a mission that would be the high point in my career. As I began meeting more pScreen Shot 2015-09-02 at 8.08.22 AMeople who had stayed behind, I felt compelled to photograph them, and as I listened to their stories, written narratives began to flow. In 2006, the Ogden Museum of Southern Art mounted an exhibition of this body of work. The University of Missouri Press published the portraits and narratives in a book titled, Holding Out and Hanging On: Surviving Hurricane Katrina.

Throughout the post-Katrina years, I have returned to visit with many of the folks who shared their lives with me. In varying degrees, many have successfully brought some semblance of order back into their lives. Even my perpetually homeless friend, Tommie Elton Mabry, who wrote a journal on the walls of a project apartment, found a permanent home before his death in 2013. Conversely, at least sixteen other people pictured in the book have died, three of them meeting their death through violence.

In addition to mounting a traveling version of the original Ogden exhibition, I have continued to explore and revisit my previous work and the themes that have shaped my life for the past 46 years; primarily people and place. During weekend sojourns in rural South Louisiana or travel elsewhere, I am consistently drawn to people who are at “home” engaging in the circumstances of their lives. Though I am often a stranger to them, I try to develop a connection drawing on our mutual experiences and this feeling of kinship gives me an opportunity to use them as a subject. Their curiosity is also piqued when they see my head go under a dark cloth to set the composition on the ground glass. Once the lens is closed, and a film holder inserted; I stand next to the camera quietly conversing with the subject to put them at ease. When the moment comes that seems inexplicably right, I release the shutter with the hope that I have captured their pure imagery, one that encompasses all that we hold dear; a chance to capture this one brief moment in our lives.

ABOUT THOMAS NEFF:

Thomas Neff was born in Los Angeles, California in 1948. He studied at the University of California at Riverside and earned his Masters of Fine Art degree at the University of Colorado in 1980. Since 1982, he has been on the faculty of the School of Art at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Neff has produced bodies of work that focus on the people, places, and architecture of Colorado and Louisiana, and has also photographed extensively in Italy, Ireland, China, and Japan. His most recent work is a series of large-format portraits and written narratives of people in New Orleans who did not evacuate when Hurricane Katrina struck. On December 2007, the University of Missouri Press published his first book, Holding Out and Hanging On: Surviving Hurricane Katrina.

Thomas NeffNeff is the recipient of grants from the NEA and the Louisiana Division of the Arts, and his images are housed in the permanent collections of the California Museum of Photography, the Houston Museum of Modern Art, the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, the Louisiana State Museum, the LSU Museum of Art, the H.S. Ransom Research Center at the University of Texas (Austin), the Spencer Museum, and in numerous college, university, and private collections.

Neff retired from his teaching duties at LSU School of Art this past May, 2015. He and his wife, Sharon, plan to travel and continue his work photographing landscapes, architecture and people.

For more information on Thomas Neff visit thomasneffphotographer.com.

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2015 LSU Folks' Arts & Crafts Show!

2015 LSU Folks’ Arts & Crafts Show

The LSU Student Union Art Gallery announces the opening of the 2015 LSU Folks’ Arts & Crafts show in the LSU Student Union Art Gallery! The exhibit is designed by LSU Faculty & staff will be held from June 22-August 27, 2015. The exhibit is free & open to everyone!

Enjoy works of art from all departments across the LSU campus! No only is the LSU Faculty & Staff talented in their full time careers here at the University, but they are also gifted in the arts! Come admire a hand made wooden ship model, cotton quilts, acrylic paintings, inspiring photographs and more. The LSU & Baton Rouge communities are encourages to visit the show to help support local artisans!

For additional information please visit us on the web, or e-mail the Union Art Gallery at unionartgallery@lsu.edu or call the gallery at 225-578-5162 between 9am – 4:30 pm Monday – Friday.

2015 20"X20"X20" National Compact Competition & Exhibit

2015 20″x20″x20″ National Compact Competition & Exhibit

The LSU Student Union Art Gallery  put out a national all to artists for the “2015 20” x 20” x 20” National Compact Competition and Exhibit.”  The call was answered by artists from all around the country including California, Kansas, New York, Washington state and more.  The selected exhibit will be hosted April 27- June 10, 2015 in the LSU Student Union Art Gallery, Baton Rouge, LA.

The 20” X20” X20 Compact Competition was established over 20 years ago to bring contemporary art to LSU that was being produced throughout the country.  LSU Students and the Baton Rouge Community will be able to see National Contemporary pieces of art ranging in mediums from sculptures to paintings to textiles & more.

This year’s juror was, Brooke Davis Anderson, who award $5,000 in cash prizes to the following wining artists:

 

Merit # 1: Justin Wilson
Merit # 2: Jeremy Entswistle

 

LSU Student Art Show - 2015
LSU Auxiliary Services & The LSU Union Art Gallery invites LSU and the Greater Baton Rouge communities to browse works of art submitted by undergraduates and graduates of the university’s student body! The LSU
Juried Student Art Show runs Thursday, March 5 – April 1, 2015 at the LSU Student Union Art Orzanne, Bri Bird SculptureGallery located on the second floor of the LSU Student Union. The exhibit is free & open to everyone.A call to artists was put out to all attending the university including students from all majors. Graphic Design, Digital Art, Pre-Nursing, Engineering, Geography, Mass Communication and Architecture answered that call. Beautiful pieces of art spanning mediums that include drawing, printmaking, photography, painting, sculpture and more are currently on display at the 2015 LSU Student Art Show!A panel of four jurors looked through all art entries submitted to the Student Art Show on February 25, 2015. This year’s jurors are Jason Andreasen, Randell Henry, Phyllis Lear & Jennifer Shaw. They selected 48 works of art from 34 artists out of 107 entries from 57 artists.1st Place: Brianna Orzanne of Baton Rouge swept away the $500 first place prize for her unique ceramic sculpture titledBrave Face.

2nd Place: Mary Perrault of Baton Rouge followed close behind and took the $200 second place prize for her magazine paper collage, Regeneration.

3rd Place: Randi Willett, a Mandeville native, won $100 for third place with her photograph Untitled.

The jurors wish to give special recognition to Samantha Hardy of_DSC0896-3 Baton Rouge for her photograph Lollipops are Illegal, John Gray of Ethel, La, for his mixed media on polycarbonate And the Clouds will Follow and Elizabeth Welch of Baton Rouge, La, for her watercolor Foment I.

Thirty-four more students from Louisiana remain in the show:

Katerina AltamirovRachel BarnettMorgan BarrancoAmy BlacketterJennifer CarwileJessica ChappuisNaomi ClementSamantha HardyGeren HeurtinKimberly JonesBrianna Lee Kelsey LivingstonMoinul MahdiWilliam MelanconEmily MillerJohn David MooreGazelle NaghshbandiBrianna OzanneMary PerraultSamantha PratherMcKenzie PriceAbedin Rubaiyet Tajreen ShuptiJoseph TurpinElizabeth WelchJohn GrayAllison StrahanAllie BergeronCaroline BlanchetTaylor PaulyRandi WillettSara DavisPhilip Douzat

Support local Student art and come enjoy art from up and coming LSU student artists at the 2015 LSU Juried Student Art Show at the LSU Student Union Art Gallery!

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 Exhibit is free & open to the public
Louisiana State of Mind - 2014

Louisiana State of Mind

People who do not live in Louisiana are fascinated by what they have heard and envision a unique and often_DSC0167 peculiar image of our state and people who reside here. If you live here you call it home. We enjoy seeing the lush green landscape, the wetlands, the many natural creatures who reside with us and the diversity of architecture seen throughout the state. It also is the comfortable feeling we have towards the land, nature, the swamps, the trees the manmade architectural landscape that reminds us of our connection with our surroundings. The artists selected for the Louisiana State of Mind exhibit are our environmental visual guardians. They see the beauty in our natural and manmade landscapes and the people who reside here. They see how the living creatures and many waterways enhance our daily landscape. They record how the land and the people help define who we are. Yet in many of the images you will in this exhibit, there _DSC0168is sense wariness. We all have encountered how outside forces have quickly changed our landscape. Will our wetlands continue to erode? Will another natural disaster like Hurricane Katrina continue to create havoc for people in the state? Will the offshore petroleum businesses maintain their drilling equipment so that there will be no more oil spills or will our coastline become an oil slick? These outside forces may continue to contaminate our landscape and environment. Even with these concerns, the artists are connected to Louisiana.

We know our wetlands are vulnerable. Yet for artists such as Rhea Gary: “The wetlands of Louisiana have long been my passion. I’ve found no other paintable space on earth where there is more contrast between vibrant colors, rhythm, and movement and, at the same time, an alluring peace of place. The fact that the marshland is gradually fading away continues to inspire me to return again and again   to capture the wetland beauty we now have before we lose it forever.”

Photographer Thomas Neff confronts us with his compelling portraits from his Katrina series. The resiliency and hope of the people who stayed behind in New Orleans are empathically portrayed. As a first responder and evacuee assistant, Neff became the visual ear for many of these survivors whose lives were changed forever. When you view his photographic portraits, the empathy he has for his new friends is apparent. Though they may be weary, hot and tired, they are symbols of hope. They are as the title of his photography book indicates, “Holding Out and Hanging On”. Neff’s early Louisiana photographs in Rural Landscapes/Country Folks shows people within their own landscapes “as they engaged in their work or leisure activities”.

With Diego Larguia’s outdoor landscape paintings of the LSU campus, one sees how ordinary buildings on _DSC0163the LSU campus are transformed into compositions where nature, seasonal weather changes, and the time of day changes lighting, envelope the manmade buildings of the campus. The blending of the natural landscape with the monumentality of the buildings creates a warm comfortable response by viewers. They may see LSU as an institution in which they admire and support but it is a symbol as what is good about living in Louisiana.

Nature is portrayed in a different way when one looks at two series of photographs by Mary Ann Caffery. Her egret series of “Out of the Darkness…Into the light “shows us dancers, who preen, and posture and dance near the LSU lakes. As Caffery states: “They are ancient, choreographed Greek stage productions where the birds are actors”. In her Louisiana coast line aerial series Caffery allows us as viewers to sense the spirituality she feels towards the Louisiana coastline._DSC0166

Mary Lee Eggart is a born weaver of patterns. In her watercolors and colored pencil paintings she weaves a story of patterns, color and shapes to tell us about the brightly colored birds whose feathers and features create engaging patterns found in nature. We are drawn towards her mastery of colored pencils and watercolor. My drawings reflect the natural world, full of apparently chaotic activity on the  surface, but revealing underlying structure and pattern on closer observation.

Robert Warrens’ sense of humor mandates that we study his six panel fantasy Wetland painting. The optimism expressed his “mindscapes” launch us into a time when the wetlands will be idyllically restored. His painting celebrates the return of our wetlands. Though nature may be destroyed or disturbed at times, there will always be a restoration process.

These six visual guardians allow us to celebrate and rejoice in the state in which we live. They show us how we are guardians of our environment and land in which we live. Each artist tells a compelling story about the Louisiana State of Mind.

2014 20X 20X 20 Compact Competion
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2014 20X 20X 20 Compact Competition & Exhibition
After being under construction since August of last year, the LSU Student Union Art Gallery opened its doors this Spring!  The Art Gallery now boasts new LED track lighting for better viewing, updated amenities that will allow the gallery to bring in more modern exhibits. The newly installed glass doors let visitors to the Art Gallery as well as the LSU Student Union see the contents in each exhibit at any time when the building is open.

The Art Gallery is free and open to the public!

For the Art Gallery’s first show since renovation, the LSU Student Union Art Advisory Committee is proud to announce the unveiling of the 2014 20”x20”x20”: National Compact Competition and Exhibition. This year the exhibit features the works of 60 artists from 19 different states. The selected works are on view through May 16, 2014, in the LSU Student Union Art Gallery at Louisiana State University.

Guest juror, Shana Barefoot of the Museum of Contemporary Art Atlanta, Georgia, awarded $6,000 in cash prizes, with a $1,800 prize for first place, $1,200 for second place, $900 for third place, and five honorable mentions at $400 each. The first place prize was awarded to Louisiana native Casey Parkinson for her porcelain sculptures Fragile 1 – 21.

Second place went to Liza Botkin-Hennessy for her gelatin silver print Synchronized Standing.  Tres Roemer’s analog collage made of cut and paste paper, Window One, placed third.  The five honorable mentions were awarded to Samuel Hoffman’s oil painting Room 662, Nancy McGee’s archival digital print on aluminum Night and Day, Burton Tysinger’s painted wood Bluff, Soonae Tark’s acrylics under acrylite Sugar Candy #52, and Jeffrey Gelick’s oil pastel and graphite Pact.

Sixteen of the 60 participants are Louisiana artists:

  • Nicole Duet
  • Joshua Duncan
  • Michael Elliot-Smith
  • Robert Fogel
  • Lucy Landry
  • Madeline Marak
  • Hannah Cooper McCauley
  • Gail Morgan
  • Dale Newkirk
  • Casey Parkinson
  • Brian Paulino
  • Keith Perelli
  • Jeffrey Stephens
  • Sydney Ruth Szot
  • Lana Bernard Toniolo
  • Mark Vargo

Other Southern artists include:

  • Mary Margaret Morgan: Alabama
  • Sky Shineman: Alabama
  • Jessie Smith: Alabama
  • Ry McCullough: Georgia
  • Kathryn Nussdorf: Georgia
  • Joseph Melancon: Florida
  • Val R. Wright: Florida
  • Burton Tysinger: North Carolina
  • Susan Card: South Carolina
  • Michael Marks: South Carolina
  • Edward Shmunes; South Carolina
  • Charlie Newton: Tennessee
  • Marilyn Avery Turner: Tennessee
  • Eva Graf: Texas
  • Jennifer Motes: Texas
  • Yorgo Pasadeos: Texas
  • Aaron Treher: West Virginia

Midwest artists include:

  • Jeffrey Gelick: Illinois
  • Samantha Haring: Illinois
  • Magda Osterhuber: Illinois
  • Domingo Parada: Illinois
  • Robert Schwieger: Illinois
  • Ian Shelly: Illinois
  • Samuel Hoffman: Indiana
  • Candace Zebell: Michigan
  • Peggy Wyman: Missouri
  • Nancy McGee: Wisconsin
  • Adam Porter: Wisconsin

East Coast artists include:

  • Sandra Tardo-Long: Maine
  • AJ Nadel: New York
  • Tres Roemer: New York
  • Soonae Tark: New York
  • Sara Zak: New York
  • Chloe Feldman-Emison: New Hampshire
  • James Parlin: Pennsylvania
  • Allegra Kuhn: Vermont

Western Region artists include:

  • Liza Botkin-Hennessy: California
  • Michael Rich: California
Centuries of Progress: American World's Fairs, 1853-1984
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Transportation Map, 1933-1934 Century of Progress, Chicago

Centuries of Progress: American World’s Fairs, 1853-1984’ was on display from June 12 – July 28, 2013. The exhibit was free and open to the public.

The exhibit presented a remarkable overview of more than a century of American World’s Fairs. Visitors enjoyed over 130 objects, photographs, and ephemera that detail progress, promotion, and public response. Beginning with the 1853 Crystal Palace exhibition in New York through the 1984 Louisiana World’s Fair in New Orleans, Louisiana, World’s Fairs have emphasized the technological, cultural, and political advances that form the American society that we enjoy today.

The exhibition was organized by the Hagley Museum and Library in Wilmington, Delaware, and is toured by ExhibitsUSA, a national program of Mid-America Arts Alliance and The National Endowment for the Arts.

A Slice of Life in South Louisiana: 1890-1920
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Dining room, home by George Francois Mugnier c. 1880-1920 from the Louisiana State Museum, New Orleans

A Slice Of Life in South Louisiana 1890-1920 was on display from April 12 – May 19, 2013 in the Union Art Gallery. The exhibit was free and open to the public.

The exhibit explored the daily lives of four cultural groups from this time period: African American laborers, Native Americans, middle class New Orleanians, and Italian Americans. The selection of items were on loan from several Louisiana public and private museums, including the American Italian Cultural Center, A Gallery for Fine Photography, New Orleans, Historic New Orleans Collection, Louisiana National Guard Museums, Louisiana State Museum, New Orleans, LSU Libraries Special Collections, LSU Museum of Natural Science, LSU Rural Life Museum, LSU Textiles and Costume Museum, and Southern Food and Beverage Museum, New Orleans. The exhibit and associated programs were partially funded through a grant from the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation.

2013 LSU Juried Student Art Show
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First place winner Jonathan Wagner with his piece Claire-May

The 2013 LSU Juried Student Art Show was on display March 10 – March 26, 2013 in the Union Art Gallery. The exhibit was free and open to the public.

Three art professionals selected 32 pieces from the 123 entries submitted to the Juried Student Art Competition, which is open to all part-time and full-time LSU students. The jurors this year were Jacqueline Bishop, painter, drawer, installation artist, and previously adjunct professor for Art and the Environment at Loyola University, New Orleans, LA; Richard Sexton, author, media and fine art photographer, and teacher at New Orleans Academy of Fine Arts; and Dr. Lee Gray, Chief Curator of Art, Hilliard Art Museum, ULL, Lafayette, LA. They awarded $2,100 in cash and gift certificate prizes.

The first place prize was awarded to Jonathan Wagner of Baton Rouge for his ceramic work Claire-May. Second place went to Katie Kostelka of Bossier City, LA for her lithograph and screen print Marilyn. Third place went to Andrew Hill of Ocean Springs, MS for his ceramic work Home Alone. The Co-Op Bookstore gift certificate was awarded to Derek Bonvillain of Lafayette, LA for his photo lithograph, silkscreen, and watercolor inkjet work Untitled. Honorable mentions were awarded to Juan Baldera, John Gray, Rachel Lagrange, Alyssa Leinweber, Andy Thompson, and Summer Zeringue.

Peter Shire: a World of Geometrics
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Peter Shire: a World of Geometrics was on display February 3-February 24, 2013 in the Union Art Gallery. The exhibit was free and open to the public.

The exhibit featured sculptural and ceramic works spanning the career of the renowned and idiosyncratic designer Peter Shire. His whimsical, postmodern style defies traditional categorization, incorporating elements of Futurism, Art Nouveau, and Art Deco. His often utilitarian sculptures have been featured in exhibitions in the United States as well as Italy, France, and Japan. His work comprises of various mediums including sculpture, furniture, interior design, and ceramics, his favored and most popular medium. Shire’s teapots are a merging of shape and color, stretching the very definition of the object in the viewer’s mind.

There was an opening reception with an informal talk by Peter Shire at 2:00 p.m. on Sunday, February 3, in the LSU Student Union Art Gallery. The show was in conjunction with the exhibits at the LSU School of Art Alfred C. Glassell Jr. Exhibition Gallery and the LSU Museum of Art in a collaborative three-part retrospective featuring Peter Shire.

Poison for the Impressionable (Conceptual Realism): A Robert Williams Documentary Exhibition
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Poison for the Impressionable (Conceptual Realism): A Robert Williams Documentary Exhibition was on display November 11 – December 16, 2012 in the Union Art Gallery. The exhibit was free and open to the public.

This biographical exhibition explored the career of Robert Williams, founder of Juxtapoz magazine and pioneer of lowbrow art. For 40 years, Williams’ work has been challenging the status quo of visual expression, incorporating significant or unseemly undercurrents of American pop culture, such as violence, fast food, sexuality, and nostalgia. This exhibit featured historical documents, photographs, high quality reproductions of his original artworks, and a 1931 Model A Ford Coupe.

Mr. Williams made a rare appearance at the university to give a lecture on Tuesday, November 13, 2012 at 5:00 p.m. in the LSU Student Union Theater. His lecture brought in over one thousand guests.

Ancient Marks: The Sacred Origins of Tattoos and Body Marking
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Ancient Marks: The Sacred Origins of Tattoos and Body Marking was on display September 15 – November 4 in the Union Art Gallery. The exhibit was free and open to the public.

The show featured examples of modern and traditional applications of body modification, conveying the social, symbolic, and aesthetic significance of this unique art form throughout the world. The exhibit included works from the portfolio of documentary photographer Chris Rainier; photographs of works from local tattoo artists Donn Davis, Adam Montegut, and Ed Dieringer; and tattooing tools from the collection of anthropologist, writer, and host of the Discovery Channel’s Tattoo Hunter, Dr. Lars Krutak.

Programs for the show included a lecture entitled “Skin Deep: the History and Art of Indigenous Tattooing” by Dr. Lars Krutak, on Thursday, October 4th at 6:00 p.m. in the Atchafalaya Room of the LSU Student Union, and a live tattoo showcase and discussion panel, moderated by the director of Southeastern University’s Contemporary Art Gallery, Dale Newkirk, with the local artists mentioned above on Thursday, October 11th at 12:00 p.m. in the Atchafalaya Room.

What’s Up, Doc? The Animated Art of Chuck Jones
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What’s Up, Doc? was on display August 19 – December 9 in the Union Art Gallery. The exhibit was free and open to the public.

This exhibit celebrated one of America’s best known film animators, Chuck Jones. In addition to adapting famous children’s stories such as Dr. Seuss’s How the Grinch Stole Christmas! and Rudyard Kipling’s Rikki-Tikki-Tavi, Jones was the creator of the award winning Looney Tunes show, which featured such enduring characters as Bugs Bunny, Porky Pig, and Daffy Duck. The exhibit included original drawings, animation cells, and animated films created by Chuck Jones as well as educational programming about the animation process. Guests can visit our character mask station and contribute their favorite Looney Tunes memories to our memory board. Guests were also welcome to visit the gallery for two programs honoring the craft and works of Chuck Jones: “The Looney Tunes: An American Pastime,” a panel discussion on August 28 at 12:30 PM, and “The Origins of Animation,” a presentation by Yeon Choi on August 29 at 12:30 PM.

Baton Rouge Collectors
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The Baton Rouge Collector’s exhibit was on display March 18 – April 15 in the Union Art Gallery. The exhibit was free and open to the public.

The show featured artwork selected from the collections of Baton Rouge residents: Susie & Carl Blyskal, Chet & Jane Coles, Becky & Warren Gottsegen, Winifred Ross Reilly, and Micheal Robinson & Donald Boutte. The pieces ranged from decorative objects to contemporary art paintings, photographs, sculptures, as well as other collectable items. This exhibition demonstrated individual collectors’ tastes, as well as the diversity of collections in the Baton Rouge area.

For the first time at the LSU Union Art Gallery, the exhibition included a documentary produced by the LSU School of Art to accompany the show.

The opening reception took place on Sunday, March 18, from 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m., with a screening of the documentary at 3:00 p.m.

2012 Student Art Show
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The 2012 LSU Student Art Show was on display February 17 – March 11 in the Union Art Gallery. The exhibit was free and open to the public.

The juried show was selected by Ann Schwab, Photographer and Assistant Chair of Visual Arts at the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts; Dale Newkirk, Professor of Sculpture at Southeastern Louisiana University; and David Horton, Professor of Graphic Design and Painting at Nicholls State University.

The first place prize was awarded to Jonathan Wagner of Baton Rouge for his ceramic sculptures Rattle and Twins. Second place went to Andy Thompson of Baton Rouge for his digital 3D animation Escapism. Third place and the popular vote award went to Juan Baldera of Port Allen for his oil paintaings Untitled and The Tree That Grows Crooked Will Never Straighten Its Trunk, respectively. The Co-Op Bookstore gift certificate was awarded to Kelsey Cook of Baton Rouge for her oil painting Nathan. Honorable mentions were awarded to Kelsey Cook, Trevor Godbolt, Elizabeth “Duncan” Raster, James Packard, Andy Thompson, Wade Tullier, and H. Cole Wiley.

For more details and images, click here.

Chalk Art
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On Saturday, March 26, 2011 the LSU Student Union Art Advisory Committee presented the annual LSU Chalk Art Competition from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the LSU campus near the Student Union. During this competition, student and community artists displayed their artistic abilities through a chalk medium. This year’s competition was held in conjunction with the Groovin’ on the Grounds music festival. The event also featured a live street painting by internationally renowned street artist Lori Escalera.

Competing chalk artists had the chance to win one of four $100 cash awards. Each participant or group was provided with a box of chalk and assigned to a 5’x5’ concrete sidewalk square on the Parade Ground. Participants were encouraged, but not required, to create a music-related work, as the event was held in conjunction with the Groovin’ on the Grounds music concert.

2011 LSU Student Art Show
The LSU Student Art Show ran from February 11- March 10 in the Union Art Gallery. The exhibit was free and open to the public.

Diego Larguia, a painting instructor at the New Orleans Academy of Fine Arts, and photographer James Baldridge of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette juried the show and chose 62 pieces by 44 different artists from the 154 total works submitted. The jurors awarded $2,400 in prizes.

Jacob Zeairs, of Mandeville, LA, won 1st place ($600) with his cyanotype photograph entitled ?. Jonathan Ryan of Baton Rouge was awarded 2nd place ($500) for his oil painting, Interior Spaces. Coming in 3rd place ($400) was Harold Cole Wiley of Baton Rouge, for his steel and wood sculpture, Follow Me In. The Co-Op Bookstore Gift Certificate ($300) was awarded to Zachary Cummings of Baton Rouge, for Fête Champêtre, an oil painting on canvas. Six Honorable Mentions ($100 each) were awarded to Rebecca Alcala, Sarah Blackmon, Ashton Despot, Charles Durio, Holly Johnson, and Sarah Phillips.

2010 Compact Competition
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The 2010 LSU Student Union Art Gallery 20”x20”x20”: National Compact Competition featured the works of 37 artists from 13 different states. The selected works were on view from Nov. 21 through Dec. 17, 2010, in the LSU Student Union Art Gallery at Louisiana State University.

The juror, Dr. Sara Cochran, awarded $6,000 in cash prizes, with $1,800 for first place, $1,200 for second place, $900 for third place, and five honorable mentions at $400 each. The first place prize was awarded to Shannon Kolvitz for his photograph The Side Road. Second place went to Tom Stigall for his photograph Gulf Shores No. 3. Richard Buswell’s Seed Pods in a Corral placed third. Five honorable mentions were awarded to Trinity Sullivan, Sky of Zeus, Brad Bachmeier, Generic Products, Sherry Lee Short, Night Burn, James B. Stire, Denham Springs, LA, and James Calvin, Tool Box.

Treasures of LSU
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The “From Gemstones to Dinosaur Bones: Discovering the Treasures of LSU” exhibition was on display from Oct. 8 – Nov. 14, 2010 in the newly renovated LSU Student Union Art Gallery. The opening reception was held on Oct. 8 from 6 p.m.-8 p.m. This exhibit showcased some of the most fascinating “treasures” owned by LSU. It included art objects, textiles, archaeological objects, natural artifacts, and other significant historical objects. The items included came from various LSU contributors, including The School of Architecture, The Costume and Textile Museum, The Graduate School, Hill Memorial Library, The School of Landscape Architecture, the Music and Dramatic Arts Departments, The Natural History Museum, The Natural Science Museum, The Rural Life Museum, and The LSU Student Union Art Gallery Permanent Art Collection.

This exhibit corresponded with the release of Treasures of LSU, a book that highlights some of the wonderful treasures belonging to LSU. This exhibit was in conjunction with LSU’s 150th anniversary celebration. Related programs included a presentation by LSU President emeritus Dr. William Jenkins at 12:30 p.m. on Oct. 27, entitled “Why Collections are Important for Universities.” On Nov. 7, we hosted LSU Treasures Day from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. On that day, visitors were able to visit Hill Memorial Library, The Natural History Museum, The Textile Museum, The LSU Student Union Art Gallery, The Rural Life Museum, The Shaver Theater, Allen Hall, and the LSU Museum of Art to view their selected “Treasures.”